I began the practice of Zen in 1967 while I was at Cornell University getting a BA in Anthropology. I dedicated ten years to the intense practice of Zen meditation. I was driven to penetrate some of the basic questions of life to the exclusion of most other things. Questions like: What is a human being? What is this consciousness we have and how does it relate to the world we live in? What is the ultimate reality of the universe? Zen immediately struck me as asking those questions and getting the direct experiential answers that I needed. I had assumed that such sources of meditative wisdom were no longer practiced and available in the world: that the ancient traditions of places like India had all died out. I was fortunate to be able to practice with a single focus hard to find these days. I have continued to follow my quest and inner directions, and to follow my own revelations and insights. I relate to the saying “Don’t follow in the footsteps of the Sages, rather – seek what they sought”.

I have developed my Zen practice and understanding through the intensive practice of other traditions, including studying at the feet of the great Hindu Guru, Swami Muktananda; the Western Mystery Tradition, and experience passed to us through the Native American and other original people.

I discovered that I had a gift at working with my hands and helping people heal through touch and bodywork. I have held Rolfing in the highest regard and am very happy to be able to offer it. It is one way I can pass on some of what I have learned and to contribute to the wellbeing of others. Ahamsa is another great healing technique to help us peel back layers of faulty thinking and reactive feelings and to get connected to our truer self. It can make a great contribution to our inner freedom and our connection to our innate love, and wisdom. I am grateful for the opportunity to offer it.

I offer the chance to do Zen meditation. It is a profound practice, yet very simple. It can benefit just about anyone. I feel an obligation to offer it as it is so rare and so profound and so to the heart of what it is to be a living being. 5 Types of Zen Video
blocks_image
blocks_image